Snail Mail

Snail Mail

Union Design is excited to be working on some fun things to send your way this year, and we think you’ll be excited about it too!

We invite you to click here and leave your mailing address for some sweet surprises.

Don’t delay, the first item is set to go out soon!

*it should go without saying that we respect your privacy and will never sell or share your information, but the internet is a weird place, and we don’t want you to have any concerns about your privacy.

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How the magic happens.

How the magic happens.

Last week we talked about how a consult can help you get to the root of the problem you’re solving, and I find it’s helpful for people to know what comes after identifying the problem.

My process is highly intuitive, which comes from experience, but there is a strategic method underlying that intuition.

We start with a kickoff meeting where we dive deeper into the problem we need to solve and also make sure all of the relevant parties are identified and involved at necessary points. We also audit existing materials.

The audit is a key part of the process for understanding what has been done, what has gone well, and what direction the organization wants to go in, we really strive to get all of the relevant information out in the open. Discovery is an intense but necessary process.

Like death and taxes, we predictably start with strategy. One way to frame the strategic thinking is with who, what, and how?  The “what” phase is really about the “why.” And Who’s on first. You’re following, right? 🙂

A great deal of what we work on in the first phase of discovery is understanding the SMIT or the Single Most Important Thing. With the focus provided by understanding our SMIT (not to be confused with Smurf) we are able to navigate the entire project with clarity. When we try to do too many things at once, we can’t excel at any of them.

The second goal of discovery is to help the team get buy in from their superiors and decision makers. This goes back to having clarity around goals and understanding the stakes and the why of the project. Often people closest to the project get excited about the new direction, but struggle to “sell” that to their superiors. Discovery helps put the project in context so that the meaning stays connected to the goals and metrics.

After what and why, comes who. Who is the audience for this project? We delve into questions around the audience and existing landscape. If an organization doesn’t know who they are talking to, their ability to communicate effectively significantly diminishes.

The third phase of discovery is the “how.” During this phase we ask what the strategy for achieving our goals are, we discuss the tone, message, and visuals. I draw on all of the information that has been discussed up to this point and I create something that aligns with the goals and messages we’ve discussed.

While design can be central to our daily lives, we rarely take the time to stop and think about the process of how something came to be what it is, (unless it doesn’t work). The purpose behind the Union Method is that we think about what we want something to be so that what we create is effective. Join us in the journey to design intentionally.

 

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Can you ever really solve your own problems?

Can you ever really solve your own problems?

Is that philosophical question, or what?

It could be argued that if you could solve the problem, it wouldn’t be a problem in the first place. But most non-profits deal with problems — problems of their clients, problems of their employees and usually people end up on this blog because they’re trying to solve a design problem. The good news is that you don’t have to solve your own design problems.

The first step to working with me, and getting your problem solved is booking a consult.

When people book a consultation, I start gathering information, my gears are spinning from the first contact. The investigation starts right away!

This can be overwhelming, but my experience helps me guide people through the process. At times, people aren’t clear on what their project goals are, or what they need, I get to the core of the project right from the beginning. We talk about all of the things I’ve been writing about for the last few weeks — audience, purpose, goals, intention — so that I can draw out the most essential information and start the design from a place of strategy. 

After a call I’m able to put together a project proposal, outlining all of the deliverables, deadlines, client responsibilities and cost. This ensures we all start the project with the same expectations and understand our responsibilities.

Once the ink is dry on the contract, we get to work!

If you’re struggling to articulate your goals, or understand the purpose of what you’re doing, don’t feel bad, it’s easy to lose sight of the big picture when you’re focused on the day to day. Why not book a phone call and get some help?

 

 

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Intention + Intuition

Intention + Intuition

*The Union Method*

Uniting strategy and visuals to create the impact you need.

What happens in the mind of a “creative” person is always mysterious to a “non-creative” person. It’s true that intuition is a powerful tool for creativity, but it’s also true that intuition is born from experience. Creative work is work — it takes practice, discipline, thoughtfulness, and skill.

While creating something that is visually pleasing is always an important part of what I do, something that is only visually pleasing, that doesn’t rely on any strategic intentions, is worthless. Getting to the goals, intentions, and strategy is the foundation of the Union Method — the process every client and every project go through to make the most effective design possible. 

What’s valuable about having a repeatable method is that it’s strategic in and of itself. The Union Method is designed to be flexible enough to work on different types of projects, but concrete enough to get the results needed in different situations. It’s both intuitive and intentional, so clients can trust that the work we’re doing is effective, without needing to micromanage every aspect of the creative process.

 

 

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Five Questions

Five Questions

Here’s the truth: design alone can’t solve your communications problems. It’s easy to think there is a magic bullet in business, but there isn’t, and treating design like it could solve all of your problems won’t address the need for strategic thinking that gives structure to a design concept.  

If the strategy isn’t there, even the most beautiful design will be hollow.

It may be pretty, but it won’t be effective.

Keep your projects on track by answering these 5 questions.

Why does this project matter?

Check out last weeks post for a succinct punch on this topic.

This question gets to the very heart of the problem that you are trying to solve — not just what the problem is, but why it’s worth solving. What changes for the better when this work is done? 

While business goals are important, it’s also worth asking why your work matters to you, to your colleagues, to your audience, to the people your organization helps. You need to understand who this project will touch, how it will impact them, and why that impact will matter! 

No matter how many times you have done this, you have to know your why. Why is rooted in your values, and when decision making is rooted in values it gives your entire project a powerful emotional foundation and trajectory toward real change. 

Thinking in this way sets your project up for success. 

How does this project fit with our broader business goals?

Once you know the values a project is meant to uphold, you need to compare those values with your more practical business goals and available resources.  Knowing that a project is important and has value is not the same as knowing a project is right for your organization.

Keep in mind the organization’s overall goal and note how this project will move you toward that goal. If it doesn’t align, reframe the project into something that will be more effective.

Who are we trying to reach?

Make your audience real and know who you are talking to. Often when I ask my clients about their audience, they draw a blank or feel that they have to speak to everyone. And if you’re talking to everyone, you’re talking to no one! If you lack clarity, start by identifying who you are not speaking to. Set aside nonessential audiences and then narrow in on your key people. 

Some questions to get you thinking: What do they care about? Who are they trying to become? What do they need from you? What journey are they on? How you can you help them arrive?

What do we want them to do?

Simply: what is your ask?

When someone comes across your annual report or direct mail or brochure, what do you want them to do? Write a check? Refer someone to your organization? A lot of the work we do gets filed under “raising awareness”. While that can be helpful, it’s not specific enough (and it can’t be measured). What do you really want? How can you give your audience what they really need? Your ask lands at the intersection of those two things. Be bold — know your ask.

How will we know if we have been successful?

Don’t forget this one. Define what success looks like. Decide how you will measure your progress.

People can hesitate to define what success looks like, because that makes failure easier to stomach. If you weren’t aiming for anything, it doesn’t matter what you didn’t hit. But you can do better than that!

Deciding how to measure your progress ties everything together — Why are we doing what we’re doing? How does this align with the resources we have to offer? Who will we help? What do we need them to do? What measurable change will we see?

Successful organizations iterate and grow year after year. Knowing what progress needs to be measured is key in being able to expand on what has already worked and strengthen where necessary.

Every new endeavor builds on what is already there, so the more work you do up front with your strategic planning, the stronger every new project will be as you build and grow.

 

Download this worksheet and try it out!

The key here is to write in your own voice, using simple, clear language. Discuss your answers with your team and get everyone to sign off.

With a clear vision, you can do amazing work.

 

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