Is your design working for you?

Is your design working for you?

At some point, you may wonder if your design is working against you. If you saw our previous post about the success of design-driven organizations and felt a sinking feeling wishing your organization was more design driven…don’t despair! We’re going to give you some things to think about when putting some razzle-dazzle back into your design.

Strategy.

The best identity systems are those based on solid strategy. Consider your overall business objectives and review your logo, brand, print materials & website from a strategic perspective. Has the organization’s focus shifted from the original designs? If you have grown significantly or are reaching a very different audience, it may be necessary to redesign to more accurately reflect your current (and future) growth. We’ve covered strategy here, here and here.

Professionalism.

Is your design professional? Often, smaller organizations launch with materials designed by a volunteer or a student. While that may be appropriate in the early stages, as the organization grows and seeks greater opportunity and influence, the quality and professionalism of the design need to keep pace.

Equity. 

Not all logos need updating. Consider your audience’s relationship with the logo. How much equity does your logo have? If your audience is very comfortable with your current logo, it’s wise to tread lightly when it comes to redesigning. In some cases, a beloved logo that would otherwise benefit from a revision might be better off with the most modest of updates.

Usability.

A logo that is difficult to read or does not reproduce well is a good candidate for a redesign. Consider how the logo is used and note any difficulties you have in its application. Usability extends to the pain points that might prevent an organization from fully employing all of the materials and tools available to them. Knowing what you want your tools and materials to do is as important as having them in the first place. 

Consistency.

Do you have too many variations in your materials? One type of font & color scheme for one event, and something entirely different for the rest? While this is not an issue for smaller organizations, larger companies with many departments may find that they’ve lost control of the brand. This is an excellent reason to revisit the design — and create a reliable Identity Standards Manual — and then make one person responsible for managing consistency.

Competition.

Consider how your branding and identity materials fit among your competitors/peers? Gather the logos from all organizations in your niche. Do any stand out as particularly well- or poorly- designed? If your logo looks out of place when viewed side-by-side with your peers, you should take a more in-depth look.

Resonance.

Beyond the specific design elements, a strong logo furthers positive associations with your organization. Do you feel that the logo accurately represents the organization? Do you like it? Are you proud of it? Does the logo —and the broader brand system— trigger positive emotions?

Undertaking this type of analysis of your materials and assets puts you in a perfect position to make more strategic and practical design decisions.

For more information or to enlist Union Design to provide a Design Audit of your logo or other marketing materials, send a note to hello@uniondesignstudio.com.

 

 

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The Value of Design

The Value of Design

Have you ever wondered how much value design adds to your organization?

As the design field moves toward greater accountability through data & analytics, we are finding more ways to measure the value of design. A 2015 report by the Design Management Institute found that design-driven businesses are correlated with greater profitability. Design-driven companies outperform the S&P 500 by 211% over the last ten years.

You don’t have to be a Fortune 500 company in order to benefit from investment in design. Whether you’re running a non-profit or a start-up, ROI of design increases as it moves up the organizational ladder. When design strategy is integrated with business planning at the highest level, you’re setting yourself up to win.

Here are a few ways to increase the value that design brings to your organization:

Improve visual quality.

This applies to products, services, and communications. It’s not just about looks (it’s never just about looks, come on, you know that!). Search for ways to optimize the experience your audiences have with your organization. Show your audiences that you care about them by first understanding them, then developing communication materials that are clear, consistent and engaging.

Unify your design approach.

As customers interact with different aspects of your organization, make sure they are getting the same message and the same quality of presentation and care. Consider all of your materials (print and digital) as a cohesive unit. Identify areas of disconnect and move toward a more consistent organizational look and feel.

Integrate design with overall business strategy.

Perhaps the most important way to boost the value of your design is to think of graphic design as a business tool, not as window dressing. To see the real results design can deliver, time and effort must be spent developing strategic materials with the audience in mind. Skipping over this crucial step limits that value that design can add — and why would you do such a thing?! Develop a design strategy that supports the most important goals of your organization. Using an iterative process around design to drive innovation will improve the user experience and pay off for your organization.

As you become more intentional about your design strategy, measure the results of design improvements so you can see what resonates with your audience.

Get in touch with Union Design to learn more about what good design can do for you.

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You can read more about DMI’s findings here.

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Intention + Intuition

Intention + Intuition

*The Union Method*

Uniting strategy and visuals to create the impact you need.

What happens in the mind of a “creative” person is always mysterious to a “non-creative” person. It’s true that intuition is a powerful tool for creativity, but it’s also true that intuition is born from experience. Creative work is work — it takes practice, discipline, thoughtfulness, and skill.

While creating something that is visually pleasing is always an important part of what I do, something that is only visually pleasing, that doesn’t rely on any strategic intentions, is worthless. Getting to the goals, intentions, and strategy is the foundation of the Union Method — the process every client and every project go through to make the most effective design possible. 

What’s valuable about having a repeatable method is that it’s strategic in and of itself. The Union Method is designed to be flexible enough to work on different types of projects, but concrete enough to get the results needed in different situations. It’s both intuitive and intentional, so clients can trust that the work we’re doing is effective, without needing to micromanage every aspect of the creative process.

 

 

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Restoring the American Dream

Restoring the American Dream

I was recently commissioned by Education Post to develop a piece of editorial art for an article by Peter Cunningham about the state of the American Dream. It was a fun creative challenge for me and an honor to work with such a thoughtful writer.

Head over the Education Post to read the article.

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